Page 30 of 31 FirstFirst ... 20262728293031 LastLast
Results 291 to 300 of 310

Thread: The Order of the Wholey Technofoggers

  1. #291
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,943

    Default





    A 3m snake believed to have been living in toilet pipes in a block of flats for three months has been caught.

    The boa constrictor, named Keith, is thought to have been abandoned by a resident who was evicted after owing 5,500 in rent to his landlord.

    The huge snake has been slithering out of toilet bowls throughout the flats in Manchester since August.

    A brave resident finally put the snake's antics to an end by coaxing the creature into a bucket.

    Keith - who is actually thought to be female - had been sighted loads of times by the terrified homeowners but no-one had been able to catch the slippery customer.

    Residents had been forced to put bricks on toilet seats in a bid to keep the snake from popping out of the pan. ...
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/cbbcnews/hi/ne...00/4353570.stm

  2. #292
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,943

    Default

    ... If the rains fail in October and November, we'll go into total crisis. I can't even begin to imagine how awful that would be."

    In all, Mr Hamilton's organisation has counted at least 24 elephants that have died over the past two months across Samburu alone.

    If the rains fail, we are all in trouble. It's not just going to be the animals dying. We'll die too, and it's not going to take long.

    And like most droughts, it is the old and the young that go first.

    That is a worrying trend for the conservationists.

    The losses on their own would not have much of an impact on the region's elephant populations, but when the old matriarchs die it is potentially devastating.

    "If you get a large-scale mortality, and you get a lot of old matriarchs going, you lose the memory banks. That's the lessons the matriarchs have learned from their own mothers about things like where to go for water," Mr Hamilton said.

    "If a matriarch dies before those lessons have been handed down, and the new head of the family makes a mistake in a drought like this, its potentially very serious for the entire group."

    This drought, of course, is not just about elephants. But they are an indicator species.

    What happens to them points to trouble right across the spectrum.

    Other less drought-resistant animals like buffalo, warthog, hippopotami and certain species of antelope have been hit hard.

    Crocodiles have been forced to migrate sometimes many kilometres in search of water. ...











    Elephants are now being poached for their meat as well as their tusks

    ... A few kilometres from the first elephant carcass, David Daballen, a researcher with Save the Elephants, found another dead male. This one was the victim of poaching.

    The carcass lay on its chest, its legs spread like a spatchcocked chicken - clear evidence, according to Mr Daballen, that it had been shot.

    "It was probably killed with a couple of bullets in its head. It would have collapsed where it stood," he said.

    The ivory had been hacked out of the 10-year-old male, but more disturbingly, each of its feet and its trunk had been removed - clear signs that it had been butchered for meat. ...

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/8267165.stm

  3. #293
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,943

    Default

    A 28ft humpback whale has been found dead in the River Thames, South-East England. Scientists who carried out a post-motem examination said preliminary results suggest the male whale had died as a result of starvation. It is the first time that a humpback has been recorded in the Thames.


    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/spl/h...969/html/1.stm

  4. #294
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,943

    Default






    A tiny bat living in central Italy has emerged from the dark and started hunting by day.

    This switch in hunting strategy is highly unusual among insectivorous bats, which routinely hunt at twilight or by night to avoid predators.

    Yet a small group of soprano pipistrelles has been spotted brazenly flying by day in a mountain canyon within an Italian beech forest.

    Only one other species of insectivorous bat frequently flies during daylight. ...
    ... These bats face a trade-off. During the day there are more insects around to feed on. But the bats themselves are very vulnerable to being caught and eaten by predatory birds, which fly by sight.

    So instead, the bats have evolved to fly in the dark, only emerging during the hours of twilight or darkness. That keeps the bats safe, and their echolocating ability allows them to navigate and hunt those insects that are still about.

    Yet over many evenings spread over two summers, the researchers continually saw this one population of soprano pipistrelles hunting insects by day.

    The bats only do so at the bottom of the canyon, where local conditions seem to provide a safe haven for day flying.

    The forest canopy lining the canyon protects the bats from predators, while offering a bountiful supply of insect food. ...




    http://news.bbc.co.uk/earth/hi/earth...00/8254222.stm

  5. #295
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,943

    Default






    One of the world's rarest and most elusive birds has finally been seen flying in its natural habitat.

    The Fiji petrel, a seabird that once "went missing" for 130 years, has been sighted flying at sea, near the island of Gau in the Pacific Ocean. ...
    ... "To see such a little-known bird at such close range was magical," added fellow expedition member Mr Tony Pym, describing his joy at seeing the Fiji petrel flying over the waves.

    More surveys in 2010 are now planned to to locate the breeding area of the Fiji Petrel, says Dick Watling of NatureFiji-MareqetiViti.

    "Once we know the location, we can assess what needs to be done to turn around the fortunes of this species," he says.





    http://news.bbc.co.uk/earth/hi/earth...00/8250215.stm

  6. #296
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,943

    Default

    Dark Moon

    In astrology, the Dark Moon is representative of the darker side of our nature, the negative side. It is the hidden depths that we know exist yet we prefer not to acknowledge. It is subtle on the surface, yet profound beneath. It is the foundations of our personality and the shocking truth that we often deny and project onto others instead. The refusal to see what is really within ourselves. The subtle refusal to see what part we may have played in some unpleasant drama of our lives, how we ourselves have manifested our fears. It is the kind of thing that we intrinsically know we have to deal with, confront the darker side in order to progress unhindered, yet most often we try to ignore. It is the deeper truth that we are forever in search of within ourselves. Probably the best use we can make of the dark moon is to explore our hidden depths, realise that we all have that darker side and go within to resolve that which ultimately hinders us. ...
    ... It is also representative of the enchantress or the seducer, one who lures another by use of sexuality or devious means. The kind who tempts another by implying that the grass is greener on the other side, that they can "rescue" someone, but it is in reality for their own selfish gain.

    The Dark Moon, Lilith, also has associations with motherhood, like her counterpart the Moon. With Lilith however, the instinctive nurturing is replaced by a strong protection of her offspring to the point that she would kill if necessary any that threatened them or caused them harm. She is also reactive against the ties involved with motherhood and the emptiness that mothers sometimes feel by isolation and the perceived lack of individuality that accompanies it...
    http://www.aquamoonlight.co.uk/lilith-dark-moon.html

  7. #297
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,943

    Default











  8. #298
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,943

    Default

    I saw some pictures of bear baiting today. It makes me feel sick to be a member of a species that causes suffering so easily, without conscience and even calls it entertainment. Collectively we have got to be the lowest of the low in terms of spiritual development.

    My feeling is that karma is real and we're destined to live the suffering we cause. Creating hell for our victims must have psychic repercussions for ourselves.







  9. #299
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    In the Portland Oregon area
    Posts
    1,065

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Anon View Post
    I saw some pictures of bear baiting today. It makes me feel sick to be a member of a species that causes suffering so easily, without conscience and even calls it entertainment. Collectively we have got to be the lowest of the low in terms of spiritual development.

    My feeling is that karma is real and we're destined to live the suffering we cause. Creating hell for our victims must have psychic repercussions for ourselves.
    I am so there with you!!!!!
    This just guts me.

  10. #300
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,943

    Default

    Hi Konstantyne

    I was a bit miserable the day I posted that and feel a bit bad now for sounding preachy. I'm not even a vegetarian so I'm a hypocrite anyway but deliberate suffering, especially as entertainment, just makes me despair.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •